Top Foods That Cause Inflammation

By Dr. Chris Chatzoglou

Aug 31

Top 4 Foods That Cause Inflammation

Inflammation

Inflammation is rapidly becoming one of the most studied topics in mainstream health care.

Chronic inflammation has been linked to heart disease, obesity, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer’s and fibromyalgia, to name a few. In fact, inflammation is rapidly becoming the most widespread illness of the 21st century.

Inflammation was even featured on the cover of the Feb 2004 edition of Time Magazine where it was dubbed “The Secret Killer.” Secret, because where once, chronic inflammation was seen as the effect of these conditions, many in healthcare are now looking to inflammation as potentially the primary cause of these chronic degenerative conditions.

Unlike acute inflammation from trauma, infections, allergies, burns, or cuts which can heal within a short period of time, chronic inflammation is more systemic in nature and can become a repeating cycle of flare ups over the years.

The problem with inflammation is that it is almost entirely due to lifestyle and environmental factors. A toxic environment, poor of sleep, stress, lack of movement will all contribute to inflammation. However, poor nutrition may be the biggest culprit.

Many of the foods we consume on a regular basis, promote the spread of inflammation throughout the body. For example:

Sugar – Diets high in refined sugars tend to produce a large rate of inflammation throughout the body. Refined sugars are found in almost all packaged foods especially in concentrated forms like high fructose corn syrup.

Vegetable Oils – Industrial fats and vegetable oils produce rancid, trans fatty acids that can increase inflammation and damage blood vessels. Polyunsaturated fats such as corn, soy, safflower and cottonseed oils are also found primarily in packaged foods and restaurant applications.

Grains – Most grains eaten today, including their whole grain varieties, are refined, processed and treated with pesticides and other chemicals. More importantly, wheat, rice, corn, etc. contain gut-irritating proteins that cause inflammation along the digestive tract. Gluten intolerance is an example of this process.

Food additives – Often used as flavor enhancers and preservatives. There is some speculation that these additives, such as MSG and coloring found in processed meats and packaged foods, will trigger an inflammatory response in people already suffering from chronic inflammation.

Reducing inflammation from food sources can potentially be a simple solution to a number of different illnesses and chronic degenerative conditions.

By eating a clean, nutritionally dense, whole food based diet consisting of vegetables, lean organic meats, low sugar fruits, nuts and seeds, we can begin to gain control over a condition that has limited the lives of so many.

About the Author

Dr. Chris Chatzoglou, D.C., is a practising chiropractor in Vancouver, BC, a freelance health columnist, a CrossFit Level 1 Trainer, co-host of the top-ranked Everyday Revolutions podcast.

Thanks for creating this. Good newsletter info to share with patients.

Kathy

Quinoa is basically a seed. Is organic quinoa ok?

    Yes, in moderation and not in place of more nutrient-dense vegetables or fruit. We used to think the sapponin-like resin on quinoa could be problem but turns out that is not the case.

Why “lean” meats? Hasn’t the association between saturated fat and CVD been busted now? In fact, isn’t all cause mortality inversely associated with saturated fat consumption?

    Yes you are correct. In this case “lean meats” refers to organic and pasture raised meats as well as wild game, which are typically leaner than their feedlot corn and soy-fed counterparts.

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